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Aboriginal Heroes

Honouring
Aboriginal Veterans

First Nations Veteran
George Underwood

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Welcome and thanks for visiting Turtle Island Native Network Your best online source for Aboriginal news and information

Click Here for More News From Turtle Island Native Network
This Section of Turtle Island Native Network is Dedicated to All Our First Nations, Native American, Aboriginal Warriors, Past, Present, Future. This web site is especially dedicated to George Robert Kennedy Sr. an Oneida warrior who served both in the U.S. and Canadian Military. He is Loved and Remembered by His Son George Robert Kennedy Jr., Daughter Bonita, Grandchildren Todd Nagle and Joshua Kennedy. He is among those Honoured During the Iroquois Veterans Annual Tribute

"This Section of Turtle Island Native Network is Dedicated to All Our First Nations, Metis, Native American, Aboriginal Warriors - Past, Present, Future.
This web site is especially dedicated to George Robert Kennedy Sr. an Oneida warrior who served both in the U.S. and Canadian Military.
He is Loved and Remembered by His Son *George Robert Kennedy Jr., Daughter Bonita Martin-Kennedy, Grandchildren Joshua Kennedy and Todd Nagle.
George Robert Kennedy Sr. an Oneida warrior, is among those Honoured During the Iroquois Veterans Annual Tribute" (Tehaliwaskenhas - Bob Kennedy*)




Turtle Island Native Network Presents Stories About Veterans
and Serving Members of the Military
View this web site with Firefox browser

Honouring a Navajo Code Talker


Memorial

We Will Never Forget
Honouring the thousands of men and women who served Canada  Aboriginal Veterans Day 2005      Vancouver Island Chapter of National Aboriginal Veterans Association Leo McGillis, Richard Parker, and Len Desjarlais, lay wreath during 2005 Remembrance Day ceremonies at cenotaph in Victoria, BC. Click Here to View More PHOTOS.
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Veterans Honoring Song

Tommy Prince
First Nation Warrior / Canadian Hero

Pegahmagabow
Pegahmagabow Legendary Warrior, Forgotten Hero
Legendary Warrior
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Aboriginal Outreach
Veterans Affairs
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Seeking Justice . . .

American Indians have the highest per-capita partipation
in the Armed Forces of any ethnic group
Native American Veterans - Storytelling for Healing
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President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom
to Joe Medicine Crow - High Bird,
at the White House in Washington
on August 12, 2009.
UPI/Kevin Dietsch

Navajo Code Talker


Metis

Veterans

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Aboriginal Veterans Honour List
surnames A to K
Aboriginal Veterans Honour List
surnames L to Z
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Military Warriors-in-Training
Raven Program
Bagshaw Rappels
with Aboriginal culture and customs
Bold Eagle

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Rangers

Aboriginal Canadians Patrolling The North
Junior Rangers

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Kamloops Pow Wow
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Native American War Veterans
Wounded Spirits, Ailing Hearts
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American Indians in the U.S. Military

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Navajo Code Talkers Association
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Code Talker

"Silao litsoo beehanii"
Navajo Code Talker, World War II veteran
Teddy Draper Sr., 82, of Chinle, Ariz.,
explained that phrase loosely translates to
"remember the ones in the yellow dresses,"
it's his advice for Veterans Day.
The Code Talker's uniform, worn today for ceremonies,
is a yellow shirt, often worn with a traditional belt.
Draper's message refers to those he served with.
( as reported November 11, 2005 by the Farmington Daily Times.)

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Veterans Monument at Kettle and Stony Point First Nation

"Jibwaa wenendmaang"
    
"Lest We Forget"
Click Here for larger image of the Veterans Monument dedicated June 21, 2003 at the Kettle and Stoney Point First Nation. Honouring Our Veterans and the men and women who served Canada and the United States in times of war and peace. Thanks to David Henry for photos!
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Aboriginal Peoples In The Canadian Military
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Aboriginal Soldiers in the First World War

Click Here to visit the Canadian legion
They were Allies to the Crown and faithful to the traditions of their forefathers.
They served with honour and distinction in all branches of the Service
And in every rank and appointment from Private to Brigadier.
They fought overseas to defend the sovereignty and liberty of allied nations
In addition to supporting the cause at home.
Hundreds from across Canada gave fully of their lives
So that all Canadians might know peace and inherit freedom.
Their dedication continues in Peacekeeping operations in far away lands.


Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument
To view close ups of various perspectives of the
Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument
click on the images below
To view close ups of various perspectives of the Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument click on the images      To view close ups of various perspectives of the Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument click on the images      To view close ups of various perspectives of the Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument click on the images      To view close ups of various perspectives of the Canadian Aboriginal War Veterans Monument click on the images

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CONTACT: Bob Kennedy

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Native warriors hold a special place of honor within American Indian society
Pacific Northwest
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Since 1901 Aboriginals Have Served
Australian Military
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Forgotten Warriors
Canadian Aboriginal men and women enlisted and fought alongside their non-Native countrymen.
While they fought for freedom for others, ironically the Aboriginal soldiers were not allowed equality in their own country.
As a reward for fighting, the Canadian Soldier Veteran's Settlement Act
allowed returning soldiers to buy land at a cheap price.
However, many of the Aboriginal soldiers were never offered nor told about the land entitlement.
Some returned home to find the government had seized parts of their own reserve land
to compensate non-Native war veterans.
Whole First Nations communities still mourn the loss
of the thousands of acres of prime land they were forced to surrender.

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20th Century Warriors
Native American Participation in the United States Military

Native American Women Veterans

Native American Women with Military Service

Native Americans Serving the U.S.

In Vietnam, more than 42,000 Natives fought the communist North Vietnamese. More than 90 percent of Native men and women who fought in Vietnam were volunteers, according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Native veterans number about 190,000 today, and Native people have the highest record of service per capita when compared to other racial groups, according to U.S. government figures.


Coeur d' Alene Warrior's Society

National Native American Veterans Association

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Oneida of the Thames


The First Warrior Project

American Indian Veteran's Memorial

A Search for Equity         Justice for Aboriginal Veterans


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Honour Recognition
and Respect      
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"I can still hear the rat-tat-tat of the guns shooting at us,
the splashes of the bullets around us as we came up the water on the beach
and my friends falling in that water.
But we had to keep moving or else we would get hit too,."
Returning to Juno Beach, France 2003 / Metis Veteran Frank Godon ,Sr.

Lori Piestewa

Hopi Nation


"American Indians and Alaska Natives have a long tradition of serving with pride and accomplishment
in the United States Armed Forces.
Today, their patriotism is reflected in the more than 13,000 American Indians and Alaska Natives
serving on active duty and the more than 6,400 reservists.
In Iraq, Specialist Lori Piestewa a member of the Hopi tribe, and the Army's 507th Maintenance Company
was the first American servicewoman killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom,
and the only known American Indian woman killed in action in any conflict.
Her bravery, service, and sacrifice are an inspiration to our men and women in uniform and to all Americans."
November 2003, U.S. President George Bush.

Click on this to see more
Aboriginal Veterans Day Nov.7th, 2003 Goldstream on Vancouver Island
Youth danced and drummed to honour the Warriors.
They created wreaths from freshly folded forest ferns
and laid them in the stream
while nearby, salmon were swimming on their way to spawn.
Some survived. Some didn't.
Click on Numbers to see more images
1    2     3    4    5    6    7    8    9    10

NAVA and DND Celebrate


Debt of

Dignity


"There is great hope for us."




Photo Courtesy of Mark Kelly


A Tribute to Canada's Aboriginal Veterans

National Aboriginal Veterans Association
Ontario Region

Mi'kmaq Veterans Tribute
Prince Edward Island

Saskatchewan First Nations Veterans Memorial

War Museum

A Tribute to Native American Veterans

Tulalip Tribe Veterans        Navajo Nation Veterans

View a Codetalkers video

Real Navajo Code Talkers        Navajo Code Talkers Facts

Navajo Code Talkers Links

Code Talkers

Use The Start, Pause or Stop features above to control this video
If you cannot see the video,
then you can Download Quicktime free
to view the above video
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Recollections

An Aboriginal Veteran - Samuel John Sinclair


Native Soldiers

Foreign Battlefields


A Warrior's Legacy


Aboriginal Veteran Family Honoured

Pilgrimage to Italy
Delegate-James Reid
National Aboriginal Veterans Association, Toronto


American Indian Medal of Honor Winners

In the 20th century, five American Indians were among those soldiers to be distinguished by receiving the United States' highest military honor: the Medal of Honor. Given for military heroism "above and beyond the call of duty," these warriors exhibited extraordinary bravery in the face of the enemy and, in two cases, made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Jack C. Montgomery. A Cherokee from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division Thunderbirds. On 22 February 1944, near Padiglione, Italy, Montgomery's rifle platoon was under fire by three echelons of enemy forces, when he single-handedly attacked all three positions, taking prisoners in the process. As a result of his courage, Montgomery's actions demoralized the enemy and inspired his men to defeat the Axis troops.

Ernest Childers. A Creek from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division. Childers received the Medal of Honor for heroic action in 1943 when, up against machine gun fire, he and eight men charged the enemy. Although suffering a broken foot in the assault, Childers ordered covering fire and advanced up the hill, single-handedly killing two snipers, silencing two machine gun nests, and capturing an enemy mortar observer.

Van Barfoot. A Choctaw from Mississippi, and a Second Lieutenant in the Thunderbirds. On 23 May 1944, during the breakout from Anzio to Rome, Barfoot knocked out two machine gun nests and captured 17 German soldiers. Later that same day, he repelled a German tank assault, destroyed a Nazi fieldpiece and while returning to camp carried two wounded commanders to safety.

Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. A Winnebago from Wisconsin, and a Corporal in Company E., 19th Infantry Regiment in Korea. On 5 November 1950, Red Cloud was on a ridge guarding his company command post when he was surprised by Chinese communist forces. He sounded the alarm and stayed in his position firing his automatic rifle and point-blank to check the assault. This gave his company time to consolidate their defenses. After being severely wounded by enemy fire, he refused assistance and continued firing upon the enemy until he was fatally wounded. His heroic action prevented the enemy from overrunning his company's position and gained time for evacuation of the wounded.

Charles George. A Cherokee from North Carolina, and Private First Class in Korea when he was killed on 30 November 1952. During battle, George threw himself upon a grenade and smothered it with his body. In doing so, he sacrificed his own life but saved the lives of his comrades. For this brave and selfless act, George was posthumously award the Medal of Honor in 1954.

American and Canadian Indians In The Military

Remembering Our Veterans and Elders

Spotlight on Our Elders
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" As individual fingers we can be easily broken, but all together we make a mighty fist."
Chief Sitting Bull
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Legal Notice . . . All contents are copyright 1998 - 2013 ... No material from this site may be reproduced, modified, republished, transmitted or distributed in any way without the owner's prior approval. All Rights Reserved by Tehaliwaskenhas Bob Kennedy . . . An Aboriginal Owned and Operated Web Site
© All contents are copyright 1998 - 2013
No material from this site may be reproduced, modified, republished,
transmitted or distributed in any way without the owner's prior approval.
All Rights Reserved by Tehaliwaskenhas Bob Kennedy
This is a Native Owned and Operated Web Site


Click Here to read more about Remembrance Day, The Poppy and the History of Honouring Veterans