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RACISM
Cultural Prejudice
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RACIAL DISCRIMINATION
Human Rights

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Challenging the Stereotypes
Including Sports Mascots
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STEREOTYPES
Seeds of Racism

Racism against Indigenous peoples
United Nations web site

Previously reported on this topic . . .

Hatred of Aboriginal Canadians
2007
Amnesty International says Indigenous Peoples are targets of racism worldwide. Striking similarities in the discrimination and patterns of abuse they have suffered.

"Aboriginal issues in Canada are not a mystery. They have been studied and researched for decades. The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples contains exhaustive recommendations to which the Canadian government has yet to respond in any meaningful way. The extent to which the issues remain elusive is dependent only on the extent to which racism persists. Steps need to be taken to address these forms of racism, or the past experience of Aboriginal peoples within Canada, including events of the immediate past such as Burnt Church, will continue to characterize the future."
.......Aboriginal Rights are Human Rights. Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Racial Discrimination
Against Indigenous Peoples in Canada

.pdf file

Aboriginal Activist Rose Henry
Click on Photo for Details


U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS CONDEMNS THE USE OF NATIVE AMERICAN IMAGES AND NICKNAMES AS SPORTS SYMBOLS
04/16/01

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has issued a statement that calls for an end to the use of Native American images and team names by non-Native schools.

In recognition of the First Amendment right to freedom of expression, the Commission's statement does not attempt to prescribe how people can express themselves. However, the Commission believes that the use of Native American mascots and their performances, logos, images and nicknames by schools are both disrespectful and insensitive to American Indians and others who object to such stereotyping.

"The stereotyping of any racial, ethnic, religious or other groups, when promoted by our public educational institutions, teaches all students that stereotyping of minority groups is acceptable - a dangerous lesson in a diverse society. Schools have a responsibility to educate their students; they should not use their influence to perpetuate misrepresentations of any culture or people," the statement reads.

USCCR, 624 9th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20425 or call (202) 376-8110.

STATEMENT OF U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ON THE USE OF NATIVE AMERICAN IMAGES AND NICKNAMES AS SPORTS SYMBOLS

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights calls for an end to the use of Native American images and team names by non-Native schools. The Commission deeply respects the rights of all Americans to freedom of expression under the First Amendment and in no way would attempt to prescribe how people can express themselves. However, the Commission believes that the use of Native American images and nicknames in school is insensitive and should be avoided. In addition, some Native American and civil rights advocates maintain that these mascots may violate anti-discrimination laws. These references, whether mascots and their performances, logos, or names, are disrespectful and offensive to American Indians and others who are offended by such stereotyping. They are particularly inappropriate and insensitive in light of the long history of forced assimilation that American Indian people have endured in this country.

Since the civil rights movement of the 1960s many overtly derogatory symbols and images offensive to African-Americans have been eliminated. However, many secondary schools, post-secondary institutions, and a number of professional sports teams continue to use Native American nicknames and imagery. Since the 1970s, American Indian leaders and organizations have vigorously voiced their opposition to these mascots and team names because they mock and trivialize Native American religion and culture.

It is particularly disturbing that Native American references are still to be found in educational institutions, whether elementary, secondary or post-secondary. Schools are places where diverse groups of people come together to learn not only the "Three Rs," but also how to interact respectfully with people from different cultures. The use of stereotypical images of Native Americans by educational institutions has the potential to create a racially hostile educational environment that may be intimidating to Indian students. American Indians have the lowest high school graduation rates in the nation and even lower college attendance and graduation rates. The perpetuation of harmful stereotypes may exacerbate these problems.

The stereotyping of any racial, ethnic, religious or other groups when promoted by our public educational institutions, teach all students that stereotyping of minority groups is acceptable, a dangerous lesson in a diverse society. Schools have a responsibility to educate their students; they should not use their influence to perpetuate misrepresentations of any culture or people. Children at the elementary and secondary level usually have no choice about which school they attend. Further, the assumption that a college student may freely choose another educational institution if she feels uncomfortable around Indian-based imagery is a false one. Many factors, from educational programs to financial aid to proximity to home, limit a college student's choices. It is particularly onerous if the student must also consider whether or not the institution is maintaining a racially hostile environment for Indian students.

Schools that continue to use Indian imagery and references claim that their use stimulates interest in Native American culture and honors Native Americans. These institutions have simply failed to listen to the Native groups, religious leaders, and civil rights organizations that oppose these symbols. These Indian-based symbols and team names are not accurate representations of Native Americans. Even those that purport to be positive are romantic stereotypes that give a distorted view of the past. These false portrayals prevent non-Native Americans from understanding the true historical and cultural experiences of American Indians. Sadly, they also encourage biases and prejudices that have a negative effect on contemporary Indian people. These references may encourage interest in mythical "Indians" created by the dominant culture, but they block genuine understanding of contemporary Native people as fellow Americans.

The Commission assumes that when Indian imagery was first adopted for sports mascots it was not to offend Native Americans. However, the use of the imagery and traditions, no matter how popular, should end when they are offensive. We applaud those who have been leading the fight to educate the public and the institutions that have voluntarily discontinued the use of insulting mascots. Dialogue and education are the roads to understanding. The use of American Indian mascots is not a trivial matter. The Commission has a firm understanding of the problems of poverty, education, housing, and health care that face many Native Americans. The fight to eliminate Indian nicknames and images in sports is only one front of the larger battle to eliminate obstacles that confront American Indians. The elimination of Native American nicknames and images as sports mascots will benefit not only Native Americans, but all Americans. The elimination of stereotypes will make room for education about real Indian people, current Native American issues, and the rich variety of American Indian cultures in our country.

Union of BC Chiefs Calls for Liberal MLA's Resignation
1999

Challenging Racism
1998
NOTE this is a .pdf file

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