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Historic Cold Lake First Nations Agreement Signed
at Treaty Grounds
July 12, 2002
Click on image for larger photo

At the English Bay Treaty Grounds, the Minister of Indian Affairs joined Cold Lake First Nation Chief Joyce Metchewais to sign a $25 million settlement agreement that relates to the loss of the Dene people's traditional lands when Canada built the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range.

"This Settlement Agreement provides Cold Lake First Nations the opportunity to strengthen and heal as well as setting a foundation for the future through the combined benefits of the compensation, access agreements, enhanced economic opportunities and the provision of new reserve land," said Chief Metchewais.

Click on image for larger photo
The signing ceremony in above photos was tied into the 2002 annual Cold Lake First Nations Treaty Days celebrations on the shores of Cold Lake, Alberta.
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Click Here to View a Much Larger Image
In 1995 Cold Lake First Nation Elders and Community Members
Camped Out on Their Traditional Lands
The Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range
Wearing the White Hat is Alex Janvier, Internationally-Acclaimed Artist
Who Was a Member of His Community's Land Claims Negotiation Team

In Photo Below, Francis Scanie, Chief in 1995 with Community Members Enjoying Their Visit to Their Traditional Lands Where They Frequented Prior to the Government Taking the Land to Create the Air Base and Weapons Range
Photos by Tehaliwaskenhas - Bob Kennedy
Click Here to View a Larger Image

Cleaning Whitefish Caught in Nearby Primrose Lake
Just Like Dene Elders Had Done Years Ago
Before Being Kicked Off Their Own Lands
Click Here to View a Larger Image

Smoking Fish and Discussing The History of Their Traditional Lands
Click Here to View a Larger Image

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GRIEVANCE ON CREATION OF COLD LAKE AIR WEAPONS RANGE SETTLED

ENGLISH BAY, ALBERTA, July 12, 2002 -

At a formal ceremony at English Bay, just outside the Cold Lake First Nations, the Governments of Canada, Alberta and Cold Lake First Nations (CLFN) announced today that the First Nation’s long-standing grievance related to their removal and prevention from having access to the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR) has been settled.

The announcement was made by federal Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Robert D. Nault, federal Minister of National Defence John McCallum, Alberta Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Pearl Calahasen and CLFN Chief Joyce Metchewais.

To reach a satisfactory conclusion, negotiations involved a complex set of interests, two federal departments and the cooperation of the Alberta and Saskatchewan provincial governments.

“This settlement demonstrates the commitment of governments to address First Nations past grievances through renewed partnerships with First Nations people and negotiating forward looking solutions that create opportunities to strengthen the First Nation,” said Minister Nault.

The Settlement Agreement resolves the outstanding grievance related to the 1952 creation of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range.

“ Four Wing Cold Lake has developed a positive and respectful relationship with Cold Lake First Nations and wishes to continue this important relationship with its neighbour,” said Minister McCallum.

“Alberta was pleased to play a key role in facilitating the agreement between Canada and Cold Lake First Nations,” said Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Minister Pearl Calahasen. “It successfully resolves a long-standing grievance and means improved socio-economic conditions and a brighter future for the community. It also highlights the importance of Alberta’s Aboriginal Policy Framework, a commitment to work together in partnership with Aboriginal communities and other levels of government.”

A large majority of the membership of Cold Lake First Nations voted to accept this Settlement Agreement.

“This Settlement Agreement provides Cold Lake First Nations the opportunity to strengthen and heal as well as setting a foundation for the future through the combined benefits of the compensation, access agreements, enhanced economic opportunities and the provision of new reserve land,” said Chief Metchewais.

Under the terms of the Settlement Agreement, the Government of Canada provides CLFN with $25.5 million and 2,023.5 hectares (5,000 acres) of provincial crown land which will be purchased by Canada from Alberta and added to CLFN’s reserve lands. In addition, members of Cold Lake First Nations will have access to the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, also known as the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range, through two Range Access Agreements with the First Nation, the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Governments of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Enhanced economic opportunities with DND are also part of the Settlement Agreement.

The new reserve land will include mineral rights and is located north of Cold Lake, south of the range, bordering the Martineau River, which is along the traditional access route that was used by CLFN members to enter the traditional territory prior to creation of the range.

Under the Access Agreements, members of the CLFN will once again hunt, fish, trap, gather and participate in cultural visits to the range. Access will be controlled to protect the safety of members using the range and so as not to interfere with military operations. A CLFN Community Liaison Office and a Joint Advisory Committee with representatives of CLFN and DND will also be established so that the First Nation will be directly involved with respect to activities to be carried out on the range each year.

The Access Agreements also have provisions for enhancing employment and contract opportunities for CLFN members with DND’s 4 Wing at Cold Lake. DND will give CLFN members information on contracts that will be available in the future and assistance in preparing proposals for bids.

CLFN is 300 kilometres northeast of Edmonton and is near the city of Cold Lake. A signatory to Treaty 6, signed in 1876, CLFN currently has three reserves in the area.

BACKGROUNDER
GRIEVANCE ON CREATION OF COLD LAKE AIR WEAPONS RANGE SETTLED
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In 1952, the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan leased provincial lands to the Government of Canada for the purpose of a creating a weapons testing range on the border straddling northern Alberta and Saskatchewan comprising 1,241,000 hectares (3 million acres). As a result of this lease, members of the Cold Lake First Nations (CLFN) and the Canoe Lake Cree Nation (CLCN) in Saskatchewan abruptly lost the support and sustenance of their traditional lands which were used for hunting, trapping and fishing. Compensation was provided to affected individuals by Canada between 1954 and 1961. The range, originally known as the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range, is now known as the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR).

The CLFN and CLCN filed specific claims in 1975 and 1985, respectively, alleging that Canada failed to adequately compensate them when the CLAWR was established. The Crown rejected the claims on the grounds that Canada had no lawful obligation to compensate First Nations for loss of access to Crown lands. The CLFN subsequently initiated an action in federal court.

In October 1992, the Indian Claims Commission (ICC) agreed to hold inquires into the Cold Lake and Canoe Lake grievances. On Aug. 16, 1993, the ICC issued its report recommending that the two claims be accepted for negotiation under Canada's Specific Claims Policy.

In 1995, the Government of Canada accepted for negotiation the grievances of both CLFN and CLCN under a special Cabinet Mandate and not Canada's Specific Claims Policy. The decision was based on Cabinet's conclusion that the severe impact on the economic base of these two First Nations, together with the accompanying social consequences, warranted an effort to negotiate a resolution of the grievances.

In 1995, the Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Chief and Council of the CLFN agreed to attempt to negotiate a settlement that would: assist the First Nation in improving the economic and social conditions in the community; recognize the past, but focus on forward looking measures to address the future needs of the CLFN.

Speaking Notes for
COMMISSIONER DAN BELLEGARDE, INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION FORMAL SIGNING CEREMONY
Cold Lake First Nations / Canada
Primrose Lake Claim
July 12, 2002

CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY
It is an honour for me to take part in this long-awaited, much-anticipated and greatly-welcomed signing ceremony. On behalf of Chief Commissioner, Phil Fontaine— who could not be here today and sends his greetings and congratulations to all concerned— I want to thank Chief Metchewais for the invitation to be a witness to history in the making.

It is an enormous pleasure for me, personally, to be back in this community, among many of the same people whom I met more than a decade ago, when I came here as a member of the ICC panel conducting the inquiry into the rejected claims of the Cold Lake First Nations and the Canoe Lake Cree Nation. My colleagues at that time, Chief Commissioner Harry LaForme and Commissioner Jim Prentice, have since left the Commission but the report we issued in August 1993 has finally borne fruit. None of us knew then, when we recommended that your claims be accepted for negotiation under the specific claims policy, that the journey to this day would be so long and so arduous. Almost half a century has passed since “the range” came into being. What has been a difficult period, demanding countless hours of hard work, has now come to an end. All parties involved in the settlement of this claim are to be congratulated for their unrelenting efforts and their dedication. From the ICC’s point of view, it is immeasurably satisfying to see that the Commission plays an important role in the settlement of specific land claims. Your success is our success.

The Cold Lake / Canoe Lake claim was the subject of the ICC’s very first inquiry. Now, ten years later, the Commission is in transition, the result of the federal government’s proposal to establish a permanent, independent claims body under the terms of Bill C-60.

We at the current Commission have urged the government to act on the creation of such a body for many years. We look forward to helping to lay the groundwork for the new body and fervently hope that it will continue—and improve upon—the work that was pioneered by the Indian Claims Commission.

On behalf of Chief Commissioner Fontaine and my fellow Commissioners, I wish you all a Happy Treaty Day and much success in the years ahead.

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ICC PLEASED WITH FORMAL CONCLUSION
OF COLD LAKE / CANADA AGREEMENT

Ottawa (July 12, 2002) -- Phil Fontaine, Chief Commissioner of the Indian Claims Commission, today offered his congratulations to all parties involved in the long-awaited formal signing of a settlement agreement between Canada and the Cold Lake First Nations of Alberta.

The claim, which dealt with expropriation of First Nation lands by the federal government almost half a century ago for the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range, was submitted to the Commission in 1993. The Commission recommended that the claim be accepted for negotiation and in 1995, the government accepted the claim for negotiation. The subsequent agreement was ratified by the First Nation in December 2001 and took effect April 8, 2002. A formal signing ceremony is being held today at Cold Lake First Nation.

"This was the first claim submitted to the Commission after its creation more than a decade ago. It is immeasurably satisfying to me and particularly to those Commissioners who took part in that first panel of inquiry, to see the claim reach a successful conclusion," said Mr. Fontaine.

Commissioner Dan Bellegarde, a member of the 1993 panel of inquiry, will represent the Commission at the signing ceremony.

The Indian Claims Commission is a temporary, independent body established in 1991 to inquire, at the request of a First Nation, into specific land claims that have been rejected by the federal government.

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BACKGROUND INFORMATION

December 13, 2001
RATIFIED!
Cold Lake First Nation Members Voted Overwhelmingly in Favour
of Accepting
Historic Land Claim Agreement

There were 1156 eligible voters. 772 members voted
Voters were from on and off reserve
625 voted Yes! 124 voted No! There were 23 spoiled ballots

The agreement is worth $25.5 million plus five thousand acres of land just south of the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range in Alberta. The deal includes sub-surface rights with the land and the land also will be added to reserve status for the band. The deal, negotiated since 1995 provides for Cold Lake First Nation access to the Air Weapons Range to pursue traditional activities such as hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering. It also means they could pursue some small c commercial activities such as eco-tourism and cultural tourism, for example.

The agreement now must be approved by Canada's Treasury Board
and signed off by the Ministers of Indian Affairs and National Defence
and it also must be approved by both the Saskatchewan Ministries of Aboriginal Affairs, Land, Intergovernmental Affairs, Energy,
and the Alberta Aboriginal Affairs Minister

Copyright
Turtle Island Native Network
http://www.turtleisland.org

Cold Lake First Nation Chief Joyce Metchewais
"It's never going to be like what it was fifty years ago.
We have to find other means to make a living and to move forward
... to grow and move forward."

EXCLUSIVE REPORT
November 1, 2001
Cold Lake First Nation to Vote on Historic Settlement Agreement
by Tehaliwaskenhas - Bob Kennedy, Oneida

Imagine F-18 fighters flying above and training for war, while Dene people pursue their traditional activities below. Impossible? No! This is a story ALL Canadians should be told.

After more than fifty years, justice has arrived in Alberta to try to make up for the social and economic devastation that has plagued the Dene.

The community was devastated when in the 1950's the Canadian government took their traditional lands for military purposes, destroying the community's livelihood and forcing them into a mostly welfare-based society.

Turtle Island Native Network has learned that Cold Lake First Nation members will vote December 12, 2001 on a historic land claim settlement agreement worth $25.5 Million plus five thousand acres of land just south of the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range in Alberta.

The deal includes sub-surface rights with the land and the land also will be added to reserve status for the band. The deal, being negotiated since 1995 provides for Cold Lake First Nation access to the Air Weapons Range to pursue traditional activities such as hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering.

It also means they could pursue some small 'c' commercial activities such as eco-tourism and cultural tourism, for example.

The story of the Cold Lake First Nation people will be a real eye-opener for most Canadians. Almost overnight, an entire livelihood was erased and the people forced into a welfare society. Chief Joyce Metchewais told Turtle Island Native Network, "People in our area need to know what really happened, why we got this deal. What really happened when we got evicted from those lands. Our pride was taken away and we could no longer be self sufficient and independent and we became slaves to welfare and all the other evils that came with it."

It is clear to Chief Metchewais that there needs to be more public education in their area of Alberta, including DND's 4-Wing Cold Lake air force base, " You know you have that air force and they come from all over the country and they say what are these Indians complaining about, they go it so good they get all this money from the government through all these programs." With obvious emotion and frustration in her voice Chief Metchewais continued, "Little do they know how damn little we get from the government. That's the thing that we have to start educating the public about ... that we at one time had it good." Recalling her childhood memories about her people Chief Metchewais speaks with great pride, "I remember as a kid, Cold Lake Indians really were proud because they worked, and everything they owned they worked for, they earned it and we didn't have to go to government for welfare ... until they kicked us out of the air base."

If Cold Lake First Nation members ratify the agreement, individual members will receive $2,500 each. Elders will receive the $2,500 plus an additional $4,500 each.

Chief Metchewais is pleased with the agreement that has been negotiated, but she is not naive to believe it will solve all their problems or make up for what happened in the past, "I don't think it will ever rectify it. We had fifty years of living under this kind of a regime. You think in one little agreement, in one year or five years it's going to be rectified? It's not! People are in that school of thought that welfare is what we're getting ...it's going to take a lot of years to change that."

The majority of Cold Lake First Nation members are Dene, but some of them are Cree.

Throughout their negotiations, Cold Lake First Nation representatives called for a settlement agreement that reflected a Livelihood for a Livelihood.

It is hard for people to 'let go' when that's their story for fifty years, but Chief Metchewais is helping her people let go, "It'll never be the same. It's never going to be like what it was fifty years ago. We have to find other means to make a living and to move forward ... to grow and move forward. That's what I hope for my people and I tell them that whenever I have a band meeting. I say things that some of them don't like but I think a majority of them know that's the way it is and they accept it."

The majority of the settlement money will be governed by a long term trust to ensure the entire community benefits from the settlement, including future generations.

Chief Metchewais sees the settlement agreement as just one part of the effort to help her people, "What we have done as a council is we have created jobs, agreements with the oil companies to give us contracts and work and education money. We encourage our people to work. We tell them that if they want to work, there is work. Just make the effort to ask, and go to work and start paying your own way."

The chief of the Cold Lake First Nation quickly admits she believes in 'tough love', "It's time that they quit blaming this and that, for the way they are. Once they know what's causing them to be in the situation they are, I think it's time for them to say ... now where do I go from here? Do I wallow in this misery or do I pull up my socks and say, well now that I know I guess I can make the changes in my life necessary so I can go forward from here."

Next August there will be an election for chief and council, and Chief Metchewais has no intention of changing her way of doing business, "You bet I believe in tough love and I've used it throughout the two years that I've been in here, and anyone will tell you from the reserve that they don't get anything from me. No handouts. If they want something, they earn it!"

Joyce Metchewais practices what she preaches, at home as well as at work, "I've used tough love with my kids. My kids are all finished high school and they're all working and independent and won't live with me. So it works!".

As Canada's Native leaders and the Minister of Indian Affairs look for direction and guidance and words of wisdom as they struggle to find solutions, perhaps Chief Metchewais' words will ring true, "I think as leaders that's what we need to do with our people. Say OK now you know what happened, now do something about it".

The following includes Highlights of the Proposed Cold Lake First Nations Settlement Agreement between Cold Lake First Nations (CLFN) and Canada, with respect to the community's grievances over the establishment of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range in 1953. Information is also provided on the two Proposed Access Agreements negotiated among Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada and CLFN, as well as the Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement developed by the First Nation.

Background

In 1953, the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan entered into agreements to lease provincial lands to the Government of Canada for the purpose of national defence as a weapons testing range. The provincial lands became known as the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, or the Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range or simply the "Range". As a result of this lease, the Denesoun'lini were removed and prevented from living in and having access to the Range and thus lost the support and sustenance of their traditional lands.

In 1995, Canada announced that is was willing to negotiate a resolution of the grievances of the Denesoun'lini related to the establishment of the Range. These negotiations were conducted under a special federal Cabinet authority. Both parties agreed that the negotiations would focus on "socio-economic measures to address the current and future needs of the First Nation".

Canada and CLFN acknowledge that this settlement package was "negotiated in response to the particularly severe impact of the Range on the economic base of the Denesoun'lini and the accompanying social impacts." The acceptance of this settlement will not effect any aboriginal, or treaty rights of the Denesoun'lini.

Canada and CLFN have included the following wording in the Proposed Settlement Agreement: ". . . this Settlement Agreement does not and shall not be construed so as to abrogate, nor derogate from, or affect in any way, any Aboriginal, Treaty or other rights of CLFN to the lands and resources of the Range or otherwise."

Negotiations on the settlement package concluded in October of 2001. Before this Proposed Settlement Agreement is to become the Final Agreement, it must be voted on by all eligible voters of the First Nation.

The Proposed Settlement includes the settlement fund, land, two Access Agreements and provisions for managing the settlement funds within a Trust. Eligible CLFN voters will vote on the entire package.

Highlights of the Proposed Settlement Agreement

The following is a summary of the proposed settlement package:

Cash Payment

Canada agrees to pay CLFN the sum of $25.5 million in cash, together with other valuable considerations provided in the settlement package, in full and final settlement of the grievances of the First Nation in relation to the establishment of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range. Should the CLFN voters choose to accept the settlement package, Canada will deposit $25.5 million (the Settlement Fund) into a Trust Account established under the Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement.

Primrose Lake Trust Agreement

The Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement will be voted on by eligible members of Cold Lake First Nations at the same time as other Agreements in the settlement package. The Trust Agreement is a document developed by the First Nation. It is an Agreement between the Trustees and the members of CLFN. Once Canada has deposited the $25.5 million in the trust account, the Settlement Fund shall be administered by the Trustees according to the terms and conditions set out in the Trust Agreement. The Trustees will be responsible for the trusts management.

The Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement will be administered by five Trustees appointed by Chief and Council. Three of the five Trustees must reside on the CLFN reserves. The remaining two Trustees must be independent, not members of CLFN, nor related to members of the First Nation and must have an education in business, accounting or law or extensive business experience.

After the Elders and Members Per Capita Distribution it is estimated that approximately $20 million will remain in the Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement. This amount will be managed by the Trustees in long term interest bearing investments. The Trust Agreement imposes strict responsibilities on the Trustees to invest the money carefully and wisely. In this way the settlement monies will be protected for future generations. The capital of the trust will remain intact and only the interest will be transferred annually to Chief and Council to be used for Band purposes. A small amount of the capital, a maximum of 10% in any given year, can be used to invest in real property.

The Chief and Council may request from the Trustees, a maximum of 10 percent of the Trust property in any given year for limited purposes set out in the Trust Agreement.

Elders and Members Per Capita Distribution

The trustees, as soon as possible after the effective date, shall have a one time distribution from the Trust Property to each surviving Elder (over the age of 60 years) of CLFN an equal share of the sum of $500,000.

Each member of CLFN will receive a one time cash distribution of $2,500. (Elders will also receive the $2,500.)

The Per Capita Distribution will not be considered income for either on or off reserve members for the purposes of calculating pensions, social assistance or disability benefits (AISH).

New Reserve Lands

As part of the proposed settlement package an additional 5,000 acres (2023.50 hectares) of land will be provided by Canada to CLFN. Canada will set the land aside as a fourth reserve for the community. The new reserve, consisting of both surface and sub-surface rights, will be north of Cold Lake, south of the Range and border the Martineau River. The land is being provided to Canada by the Province of Alberta. Canada is assuming all the costs of establishing the reserve and such costs will not be deducted from the proposed settlement money. The establishment of the new reserve will not result in any decrease in current funding levels of the First Nation.

Access Agreements

Another aspect of the settlement package are two Proposed Access Agreements with Alberta, Saskatchewan and Canada. Under these Proposed Access Agreements, CLFN members will be allowed access to the Range for cultural activities, elder=s visits, hunting, fishing, gathering and harvesting. Some commercial activities such as fishing and trapping may also occur. All CLFN activities in the Range , such as hunting, fishing and trapping, will be subject to Provincial laws. There also will be opportunities for selective logging in the Range for the purpose of log house construction on reserve.

The Proposed Access Agreements provide for the identification and protection of burial and other heritage sites. There are also provisions within the Proposed Access Agreements for the carrying out of archeological research and field work to identify heritage sites used by the ancestors of the Denesoun=lini.

DND has agreed to provide assistance to CLFN in relation to procurement contracts and employment within 4 Wing, Cold Lake=s control. This will give CLFN information on contracts that will be available in the future and assistance in preparing proposals for procuring contracts and employment.

CLFN will establish a Liaison Office to coordinate and manage access to the Range. DND , CLFN, Alberta and Saskatchewan will meet periodically, at least annually, to discuss activities within the Range conservation and protection of heritage sites.

Voting Procedures for Ratification of the Proposed Settlement

As part of the Proposed Settlement Agreement, Canada requires that all eligible voters of CLFN vote on the Proposed Settlement by secret ballot. This vote is called the Ratification Vote. Eligible voters include any member of CLFN, 21 years of age or older on the voting day, Wednesday, December 12, 2001, residing either on reserve or off reserve.

Canada requires the Voter's List be prepared by the Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and that all eligible voters as shown on the Band List maintained by the department be entitled to vote. If you are an eligible voter and want to check to see if your name is on the Voter's List or to get your name on the list, please call Veronica Russell, Ratification Officer, Alberta Region, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) at (780) 495-2131. Collect calls will be accepted.

The approval of the settlement package including the Proposed Settlement Agreement, the Proposed Primrose Lake Trust Agreement and the two Proposed Access Agreements shall be obtained if a majority, over 50 per cent, of eligible members vote and, in addition, a majority, over 50 per cent, of the votes cast are in favour of the Proposed Agreements. Should this occur, Chief and Council will have the authority to sign the Agreements.

Voting Day and Where to Vote

Voting on the Proposed Settlement Agreement will take place on Wednesday, December 12, 2001. There is only one day set aside for voting and there will be no advanced voting by eligible members who may not be able to attend to a polling station. All members of CLFN who are eligible to vote living off reserve, at a known address, will receive a mail-in ballot. Members eligible to vote living on reserve who will be away on voting day, may request a mail-in ballot by calling Ms. Russell at the telephone number listed.

Voting will take place on Wednesday, December 12, 2001 at the following locations:

Denesoun'lini at the Band Administration Office, between 9 am and 8 pm;

Foster Creek SAGD Site (Range), between 2 and 6 pm; and

Edmonton, INAC Office, 6th Floor, Canada Place, 9700 Jasper Ave. between 9 am and 8 pm.

Cold Lake First Nation Negotiating Team

Since the start of negotiations in March1995, Chief and Council have been responsible for the negotiation of this proposed settlement. Former Chief Francis Scanie and Council negotiated from 1995 through 2000. The current negotiation team consists of Chief Joyce Metchewais, and Councillors, James Blackman, Roderick Charland, Cameron Janvier, Albertine Minoose, Aldina Piche and Dwayne Nest. They have been assisted by legal counsels, Brian Crane, Tony Mandamin and Wilma Jackknife, Bob Brown, a financial adviser, and Alex Janvier. The Chief and Council and the others on the negotiation committee encourage all eligible voters to participate in the upcoming Ratification Vote.

Information Meetings for Eligible Voters

Information meetings for eligible voters of the Denesoun'lini on the Proposed Settlement Agreement, the Proposed Trust Agreement and the Proposed Access Agreements, will be held to discuss details and answer your questions. Please plan to attend. The dates for these meetings are as follows:

November 14, 2001 at the CLFN Band Administration Office at 10 am; and

November 15, 2001 at the Ramada Inn, 11834 Kingsway Ave in Edmonton at 6 pm.

For Further Information

To obtain a copy of the on the Proposed Denesoun=lini Settlement Agreement, the Proposed Trust Agreement and the Proposed Access Agreements or to obtain further information regarding the proposed settlement, please contact, Pamela Grandbois or Alex Janvier at (780)594-7183. To obtain further information on the Ratification Vote for the proposed settlement, please contact, Veronica Russell, Ratification officer, Alberta Region, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada at (780) 495-2131, collect calls will be accepted.

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