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An Inspiration for Young People - Dr. Evan Adams
Drury University's Hope and Action Convocation Series
December 6, 2007 - LISTEN HERE!

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Evan Adams
Doctor, film and tv actor, health and community activist,
basic all round good guy . . . and More . . .
May 29, 2007

Doctor Evan Adams is among the people named by the BC Government as participants on a newly created ActNow BC Leadership Council - to lead British Columbia in the promotion of healthy living and physical fitness. This folows the recent appointment of Dr. Evan Adams as the first-ever Aboriginal Health Physician Advisor with the Office of the Provincial Health Officer, B.C. Ministry of Health.


Above is an excerpt from the Spring 2007 issue
of the Inter Tribal Health Authority newsletter.
- - - - - - - -
News and Comment
by Tehaliwaskenhas
Bob Kennedy, Oneida
Copyright
Turtle Island Native Network
http://www.turtleisland.org

December 9, 2005

Dr. Evan Adams, a Tla'Amin / Sliammon First Nation member will be honoured this weekend at the College of Physician and Surgeons, Family Medicine gathering in Vancouver.

He will receive the prestigious Murray Stalker Award. The national recognition is awarded to an outstanding family medicine resident recognized as a potential future leader in that discipline. The Murray Stalker Award is named in honour of the late Dr. Murray Stalker, first CFPC President, and recognizes and promotes scholarly activities of family medicine residents. The Murray Stalker Award includes $1,000. Evan also received a Family Medicine Resident Leadership Award. Out of the 16 winners of that award, he was chosen to receive the Murray Stalker Award.

Evan Adams manages to find the energy and time to continue to juggle two amazing careers. The Powell River Peak newspaper near his home community recently reported, - - - He admits it is a constant balancing act. "Sometimes I see my patients still with my make-up on and my hair all sprayed back. Sometimes I arrive at set covered with blood. It's very, very bizarre." (See below the complete article from Laura Walz, Editor of the Powell River Peak)

Although Actor Adams is always recognized from his role in the hit movie Smoke Signals, his acting career is still hot - - - Evan Adams appears regularly in the CBC TV series Da Vinci's City Hall.

As for Doctor Adams - - - After completing his family medicine residency in aboriginal health earlier this year at St. Paul's Hospital, he was named director of the Division of Aboriginal People's Health, department of family practice, University of British Columbia.

He is also a founding Council member of the Canadian Aboriginal Leaders in Medicine (CALM). This is a student and resident-run organization that looks at Aboriginal heath curricula and issues of collegiality between Aboriginal medical students, residents and physicians nationally. Evan is also a Board member of the Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada (IPAC).

He works closely with the local Aboriginal community with whom he has many contacts, fans and admirers. His hands-on community work has included serving in the past as president for several years of Healing Our Spirit, BC First Nations' AIDS Society.

NOTE: The following feature article is from the Powell River Peak
and is posted here with permission.

Adams finds balance in actor-doctor blend
Laura Walz, Peak Editor 11/23/2005

Tla'Amin First Nation member recognized nationally with 2005 Murray Stalker Award

While most people struggle to master one career, a Tla'Amin (Sliammon) First Nation member succeeds brilliantly at two challenging professions.

Evan Adams, both a doctor and an actor, will be receiving a prestigious national award next month from the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

The formal presentation of the award is scheduled for December 9 during the Family Medicine Forum in Vancouver. The association recently presented Adams with the Family Medicine Residents Leadership Award for the province of BC.

Provincial winners across Canada competed at the national level and Adams won. He is the 2005 winner of the Murray Stalker Award.

To win a national award cracks him up, Adams says, his remarks punctuated by his inimitable hearty guffaw.

"I'm really just a regular guy when it comes to medicine," he laughs. "I've worked very hard to shed my actor leanings and actor image and try to be a brainiac. It's hard. In fact, that was my theme song, 'This is hard.'"

One of his friends had a best actress nomination at a film festival last year, he says. "I've had best actor nominations, and those are pretty glamorous, pretty amazing. Then she had one and I was so jealous. I thought, 'We don't have glamorous awards in medicine.' I guess this is as good as it gets."

In 1998 Adams won the Independent Spirit Award for Best Debut Performance for his role as Thomas Builds-the-Fire in Smoke Signals. Other film credits include The Business of Fancy-dancing and Lost in the Barrens. As well, he co-directed with Jan Padgett Klah ah men: as far back as the story goes, a documentary about Sliammon. He is also a playwright, weaver and dancer.

In May Adams finished his residency in aboriginal health at St. Paul's Hospital, and in September he became the new director of the division of aboriginal people's health in the department of family practice at the University of British Columbia.

"I basically promote aboriginal health in academia," he says. "In the faculty of medicine, in the department of family medicine, I have research, teaching and clinical duties, and I liaise with aboriginal communities."

As well, he is a regular on Da Vinci's City Hall, a CBC drama that grew out of Da Vinci's Inquest, in which Nicholas Campbell plays the part of a coroner, then in the new series the newly elected mayor of Vancouver.

Adams plays the good city councillor, he explains. "It's very hard work and a very challenging role. I never watch the show, but I know it's a good show and I know that when I work, it's tough. It's nice to flex my muscles a bit in that arena."

He says it's a nice happy medium, half-time with the university as an academic doctor and part-time on a "really great Canadian show. I think it's working out, but we'll see though."

He admits it is a constant balancing act. "Sometimes I see my patients still with my make-up on and my hair all sprayed back. Sometimes I arrive at set covered with blood. It's very, very bizarre."

However, he couldn't do one without the other, he says. "Medicine is too hard to do all by itself and acting is too crazy-making to do all by itself."

This is Adams' 10th year in medicine and 20th year as an actor. "It has taken a lot of work to be here. I still feel like I don't know anything about either of them, but I guess I must know a little bit by now."

Sliammon is still his home, he says, and he's here all the time. "My dad is still trying to teach me how to be a good hunter and fisher," he laughs. "I still have stuff to learn."

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